Dash cam

Meteor explosion captured by SA dad’s dash cam, expert says, forecasts dramatic ‘storm’ forecast

A fiery meteor was filmed exploding in the sky by a South Australian driver’s dash cam.

Neal Hopgood was traveling along the Riddoch Highway between Allendale and Port MacDonnell on Saturday when a bright blue-white light appeared in the distance for a few seconds.

“I had my son and his friend in the back…we just saw the last bit explode,” he said.

“To be honest, I just thought it was a plane because the smoke trail behind it was a bit wonky.”

It was the friend of his son Liam, 6, whose voice can be heard in the footage as he noticed the light.

“What is that?” said Liam.

“It descended into the sky and then exploded, this light.”

Mr. Hopgood said he was surprised to have filmed such an event.

“It was just absolute luck…I was very surprised at how clear it was on the dash cam,” he said.

“It was quite extraordinary to see it and the daylight made it even rarer.”

Space to play or pause, M to mute, left and right arrows to search, up and down arrows for volume.

Meteor lights up Tasmanian skies

“Even rarer to see”

Eleanor Sansom of Curtin University’s Space and Technology Center and the Desert Fireball Network said cameras monitoring space activity in the backcountry missed the meteor by five minutes.

“It’s actually pretty hard to tell where it came from, just from what we’ve seen, but the fact that it’s so bright is definitely what we call a fireball… a meteor isn’t than the technical word for a shooting star,” she said.

Space to play or pause, M to mute, left and right arrows to search, up and down arrows for volume.
Play the video.  Duration: 15 seconds

Meteor lights up the skies over South Australia

Dr Sansom said a shooting star was usually made up of small particles that exploded in a ball of fire such as that filmed by Mr Hopgood.

“These are much rarer, especially when… there’s still some sort of sunlight – it’s even rarer to see,” she said.

“It’s pretty hard to say, but the ones that come through that are brilliant like that could be anywhere from the size of a football to the size of a car.”

Space to play or pause, M to mute, left and right arrows to search, up and down arrows for volume.
Play the video.  Duration: 30 seconds

Mysterious fireball trails across WA in the distance

Forecast of “meteor storm”

Dr Sansom said the meteor’s fiery disappearance could signal the start of an upcoming “storm”.

The Southern Taurids meteor shower is expected to be seen from November 4-9.

“There’s a meteor storm expected this year, so maybe over the next few nights we’ll get a lot of them,” Dr Sansom said.

“The last time it had a small burst in the atmosphere was in 2015 – so it’s been a while since we’ve had many meteors from this stream and it should happen again this year.

“They’re much easier to see when it’s dark.

“This one, probably if you look around the northeast around 9:15 p.m. you should start seeing some.

“It’s usually only six to ten per hour, but you might get lucky.”