Dash cam

Garmin Dash Cam 67W review

Anyone with a penchant for cycling, running, hiking, or just about any outdoor activity will likely be familiar with Garmin’s family of computers, smartwatches, and navigation aids.

The common thread running through all of this great tech is an equally brilliant and easy-to-use Connect app – arguably one of the best hubs for overall health and wellness.

Thankfully, the tech giant’s expertise in this area has extended to its Garmin Drive app, which, while not as simple and comprehensive as its lifestyle-focused Connect software, still has a long ahead of some of its clunky dash cams. rivals.

The reason we insisted on this so early in the review is that the main difference between the 67W and the 66W that it effectively replaces is its ability to connect to a trusted Wi-Fi source and pull the power. make the most of its new connected prowess.

Garmin 67W release date and price

The Garmin 67W is available to buy now for £ 199 / $ 259.99 / AU $ 369.

Once online (you can trust multiple Wi-Fi networks, so it will theoretically work when you go to work, home, grandma’s house, etc.), the camera will automatically download all the clips saved to Garmin’s Storage Vault, where they’ll be backed up for 24 hours… or longer, if you purchase a storage plan.

Plus, owners can open the Garmin Drive app and receive a live feed from the camera, even when the car is parked. Again, and we hate to bring bad news, this requires a constant power source, so you’ll have to invest in a separate cable and hook it up to the vehicle’s battery or fuse board. Moments of fun.

But let’s not be too negative here, because the Garmin 67W is still a very good dash cam, packed with all of the high end features we enjoyed in the 66W. These include crisp 4K 1440p video footage, captured in optimal lighting conditions and on gray drizzle days, thanks to a High Dynamic Range (HDR) feature, similar to those found on modern smartphone cameras. .

Garmin 67W Dash Camera

(Image credit: Avenir)

As with most dash cameras today, the little Garmin will automatically save footage to a microSD card (which isn’t included in the box) when the built-in G-Sensor detects a crash or shunt. It also records in a constant loop, overwriting any old footage that is not recorded by the system or manually by the user.

Interaction with the unit is via four small buttons on the side – but, remember, the 67W is about the size of a matchbox, so those buttons aren’t that big. From there, it’s pretty self-explanatory; the buttons deal with many of the in-camera settings, including the ability to turn off additional forward collision warnings, lane departure warnings, and other downright annoying warnings.

Garmin 67W Dash Camera

(Image credit: Avenir)

The screen is only 2 inches wide, so it’s great for the initial setup, but you wouldn’t really want to interact with the unit or look at the screen while driving. Chances are, you’ll store the brilliantly compact 67W near the rear window, route its wiring properly, and then leave it. It’s so small that it’s unlikely to attract the unwanted attention of thieves when parked either.

Surprisingly, the battery life lasts around 30 minutes when the power is disconnected, but the camera will try to turn off as soon as it detects that the ignition has been turned off. This means that any longer monitoring task will require a fair amount of wiring, but it’s the same as any other rival that offers these “constantly connected” features.

The big difference between them and the Garmin Dash Cam 67W is that to get the most out of the Garmin smartphone app, the camera needs to be on a Wi-Fi network, which is done via Garmin Drive. I had a little trouble connecting to my home network; it took a few tries. But it is a fairly easy task to repeat several times.

Garmin 67W Dash Camera

(Image credit: Garmin)

This can be repeated with other networks, if there is one near where you park at work, for example. Another option is to buy a mobile hotspot and keep it in the car. As long as it is charged (or connected to power), it is possible to remotely access the camera wherever you are. It’s a cool feature, but it’s certainly not unique, as the inexpensive Vava 2K Dual Dash Cam we tried offered the same service as well. Alternatively, the BlackVue DR750-2CH LTE even accepts a SIM card, eliminating the need for a mobile hotspot.

Garmin 67W Dash Camera

(Image credit: Garmin)

Garmin 67W Dash Camera

(Image credit: Garmin)

Should you buy the Garmin Dash Cam 67W?

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